Courses

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Love and its maladies
AS.300.334 (01)

Much of what we know about love and desire we owe to fiction’s ability to evoke these experiences. Consider for example that the publication, in Germany, of The Sorrows of Young Werther inspired young men across Europe to dress and behave just like this lover. Just as nowadays film and television represent, as well as mold our conceptions of love, love-stories from the eighteenth-century onwards have given shape to gendered subjectivities in ways that still matter now. As, intriguingly, illness is a recurrent theme in many modern love stories, we will be prompted to decipher signs and symptoms in the bodies of mind of our protagonists. Why is it that in Western cultures, passion is tightly interwoven with a landscape of pain, suffering, and disease? In studying texts that represent major aspects of a romantic sensibility, we are indeed invited to trace the steps of a history of the body increasingly defined by gender and by medical knowledge. The readings for this class (all available in English) include: Austen, Persuasion; Balzac, The Unknown Masterpiece; Barthes, Lover’s Discourse; Goethe; The Sorrows of Young Werther; Mann, Death in Venice; Winterson, Written on the Body.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Ender, Evelyne
  • Room: Gilman 219
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and Culture
AS.211.361 (01)

In this course we will study and analyze the notion of dissent in Israeli society and culture on its various literary and artistic forms. We will examine the emergence and the formation of various political and social protest movements, such as the Israeli Black Panthers, Israeli feminism and the 2011 Social Justice protest. We will discuss at length the history and the nature of dissent in the military and in relation to Israeli wars and will track changes in these relation. Significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the literary, cinematic and artistic aspects of Israeli protest and their influence on Israeli discourse. We will explore the nature and role of specific genres and media such as the Israeli satire, Israeli television, newspaper op-ed and the recent emergence of social media. Students wishing to work in English exclusively for 3 credits should enroll in section one. Students who are fluent in Hebrew and are wishing to attend an additional hour-long Hebrew discussion session per week with Professor Cohen (time TBD in consultation with enrolled students) for 4 credits should enroll in section 2.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stahl, Neta
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP

Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist Fantasies
AS.300.324 (01)

Comedy and musical comedy film flourished in the USA during the Great Depression as well as in the USSR during the Stalinist Great Terror. This course will compare films of the era in a variety of genres (musical, epic, Western, drama), examining the intersections between politics and aesthetics as well as the lasting implications of the films themselves in light of theoretical works on film as a medium, ethics and gender.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne, McCabe, Nathan
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

Introductory survey of foundational texts of modern Western literature and thought. This semester will include works by René Descartes, Max Weber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, Theodor Adorno, Michel Foucault, Cora Diamond, and Stanley Cavell. The course is taught in lectures and seminar discussions led by the course faculty.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Krieger 302
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Freshman Seminar: Borges and Scientific Knowledge
AS.211.137 (01)

A survey of the stories and essays of the great Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges focusing on the theory of knowledge he developed over his long career. Special attention will be paid to the implications his ideas have for the mathematical and physical sciences, in particular cosmology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Egginton, William
  • Room: Gilman 413
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the Arts
AS.211.477 (01)

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death between 1400 and 1800? What traits did European witch-mythologies share with other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in theology, literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts, including cinema.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Stephens, Walter E
  • Room: Gilman 132
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/40
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees
AS.300.402 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course investigates recent debates about being a person in literature and law. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Although our explorations will be focused on these questions, the genre of materials examined will be wide-ranging (including legal essays, philosophy, contemporary novels, and film). Texts will include novels by William Gibson and Lydia Millet, essays by John Dewey and Daniel Dennett, and films such as Ex Machinaand Her.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Levi, Jacob Ezra, Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Forms of Moral Community: The Contemporary World Novel
AS.300.336 (01)

Literary and philosophical imaginations of moral community in the post-WWII period (1950-2001). Texts include: Coetzee, Disgrace; McEwan, Atonement;Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Ishiguro, An Artist of the Floating World; Roy, The God of Small Things; Lessing, The Grass is Singing; Mistry, A Fine Balance;Morrison, Beloved; and essays by Levi, Strawson, Adorno, Murdoch, Beauvoir and Barthes on the deep uncertainty over moral community after the crisis of World War II. Close attention to novelistic style and narrative will inform our study of the philosophical questions that animate these works. What does it means to acknowledge another person’s humanity? Who are the members of a moral community? Why do we hold one another responsible for our actions? How do fundamental moral emotions such as contempt, humiliation, compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, and regret reveal the limits of a moral community?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Ong, Yi-Ping
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

China in Imagination
AS.300.410 (01)

What is China? This question has gained new relevance amid the nation’s recent rise as a global power. We survey how China was imagined, represented, and conceptualized in literature, film, and philosophical writings from mainland China, overseas Chinese communities, East Asia, and the West from the late nineteenth century to the present. Through exploring this complex history, we aim to understand China and the contemporary world in a diversified, historically self-reflective way. Topics of discussion include, but not limited to, representation, identity, form, allegory, exile, diaspora, modernism, translation, world history, and universality. All readings are in English; all films subtitled in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Imagining Climate Change
AS.300.342 (01)

Climate change poses an existential threat to human civilization. Yet the attention and concern it receives in ordinary life and culture is nowhere near what science tells us is required. What are the causes of this mismatch between crisis and response? What accounts for our collective inability to imagine and grasp this new reality, and how can it be overcome? In pursuit of these questions, we will look at texts from politics, philosophy, literary theory, and religion that frame climate change as a fundamental challenge not only to humanity but to the humanities: the disciplines and modes of thought that we rely on to make sense of the human condition. The second part of the course will examine works of literature and film for examples of how contemporary artists attempt to make the climate crisis visible and intelligible to us.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 10:15AM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Literature and the World
AS.300.344 (01)

This course interrogates how modern literature not simply reflects the world but functions as world-making power. What is a world? How do we conceive of, live in, and change it? What if there are multiple worlds? How are literature and other aesthetic forms crucial to tackling these questions? We will survey literary and philosophical texts in a comparative setting, engaging examples from both Europe and East Asia. All readings are in English. Open to graduate students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.300.334 (01)Love and its maladiesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMEnder, EvelyneGilman 219
AS.211.361 (01)Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and CultureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStahl, NetaKrieger 302INST-GLOBAL, INST-CP
AS.300.324 (01)Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist FantasiesMW 10:30AM - 11:45AMEakin Moss, Anne, McCabe, NathanGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaKrieger 302INST-PT
AS.211.137 (01)Freshman Seminar: Borges and Scientific KnowledgeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMEgginton, WilliamGilman 413GRLL-ENGL
AS.211.477 (01)Witchcraft and Demonology in Literature and the ArtsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMStephens, Walter EGilman 132GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL, ENGL-PR1800
AS.300.402 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, TreesT 1:30PM - 4:00PMLevi, Jacob Ezra, Siraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
AS.300.336 (01)Forms of Moral Community: The Contemporary World NovelMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMOng, Yi-PingGilman 208
AS.300.410 (01)China in ImaginationTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208INST-GLOBAL
AS.300.342 (01)Imagining Climate ChangeTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208GRLL-ENGL, INST-IR, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.300.344 (01)Literature and the WorldT 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, Satoru 

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (21)

In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Field trips offer opportunities to explore Baltimore neighborhoods such as The East Side, Station North and Baltimore’s old Chinatown. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Camera experience is a plus, but not a prerequisite. Digital SLR are available on loan for the semester. Attendance in first class is mandatory. Approval in this course will be considered after enrollment in SIS.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 12:45PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Phyllis A
  • Room: Mattin Center 204
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What Is Work?
AS.300.238 (85)

What is the meaning of work? Why do we value some types of work more than others? Does working make you a good person? What would we do if we didn’t have to work? Since Plato, philosophers, theologians, entrepreneurs, and artists have provided us with different answers to these questions. In this course we will closely analyze a wide range of materials, including philosophy, film, literature, and social theory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Wells, Madeline
  • Room: Gilman 400
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 20/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (24)

In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Field trips offer opportunities to explore Baltimore neighborhoods such as The East Side, Station North and Baltimore’s old Chinatown. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Camera experience is a plus, but not a prerequisite. Digital SLR are available on loan for the semester. Attendance in first class is mandatory. Approval in this course will be considered after enrollment in SIS.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 9:00AM - 12:45PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Phyllis A
  • Room: Mattin Center 204
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Cinema and Philosophy
AS.300.399 (21)

Do movies have anything to say about philosophical problems? Why is contemporary philosophy so interested in cinema? What are the most productive ways of bringing films and philosophy into conversation?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Sirin, Hale
  • Room: Gilman 208
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Philosophy of Narrative
AS.300.230 (21)

Do literary characters exist? Can we learn from fictional narratives? How does narrative time shape the experience of the reader or the spectator? This course will explore the philosophical issues raised by literary and cinematic narratives. Narrative art not only engages our reason, but also our emotions and imagination, allowing us to deepen our understanding and transform ourselves. We will address a wide range of questions about the nature of storytelling, fictional characters and human existence, literary and cinematic experience, narrative time and memory. Readings include a diverse selection of ancient and modern, literary and theoretical texts, including selections from Plato and Aristotle, the Odyssey, the Hebrew Bible, as well as modern and contemporary works by the Brothers Grimm, Heinrich von Kleist, Marcel Proust, Maggie Nelson, Ken Liu, Alfred Hitchcock and Chantal Akerman. All readings will be in translation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:00PM - 4:45PM
  • Instructor: Sirin, Hale
  • Room:  
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 12/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.371.303 (21)Documentary PhotographyTTh 9:00AM - 12:45PMBerger, Phyllis AMattin Center 204
AS.300.238 (85)What Is Work?Wells, MadelineGilman 400
AS.371.303 (24)Documentary PhotographyTTh 9:00AM - 12:45PMBerger, Phyllis AMattin Center 204
AS.300.399 (21)Cinema and PhilosophyTTh 1:00PM - 4:45PMSirin, HaleGilman 208
AS.300.230 (21)Philosophy of NarrativeTTh 1:00PM - 4:45PMSirin, Hale GRLL-ENGL