Courses

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Wired to Read: the Science and the Art
AS.001.123 (01)

We all think we know that reading is: of course, that's what you are doing right now, as you are trying to make sense of words I have written. But how do we do we do it? How do mere shapes and lines on the page suddenly begin to mean something? Is our brain wired for reading? Apart from our eyes, are other parts of the body involved? When did humans start to write and read? These are the kinds of questions we’ll pursue. This First-Year Seminar will explore two distinctive perspectives: one literary, the other is scientific. We'll divide our attention between the study of chapters and articles that present scientific findings about how we read and a practical exploration of a novel. Literary works tax our brains in multiple ways and our example will show why and how. George Eliot's The Mill of the Floss, will serve as our case-study. We'll learn why fiction can make us cry or make us angry about the world, how word-pictures trigger our imagination, how a writer tricks us (or our brains?) into believing the things that words in print evoke. As a story of growth in adversity filled with memories, drama, and insights about society and gender, The Mill on the Floss is bound to hold your attention.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 4:00PM - 6:30PM
  • Instructor: Ender, Evelyne
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern Mythmaking
AS.040.121 (01)

This course focuses on major and often intricate myths and mythical patterns of thought as they are reflected in compelling ancient visual and textual narratives. Being one of the greatest treasure troves of the ancient world, these myths will further be considered in light of their rich reception in the medieval and modern world (including their reception in the modern fields of anthropology and philosophy).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Yatromanolakis, Dimitrios
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Old World/New World Women
AS.060.388 (01)

The course considers the transatlantic writing of three women in the early modern period, Anne Bradstreet, Aphra Behn, and Phillis Wheatley. We will consider issues of identity, spatiality, religion, commerce, enforced labor, sexuality, race, and gender, along with literary tradition, formal analysis and poetics. We will read a good deal of these early women writers. Foremost in our mind will be the question of how perceptions of space and time are mediated through the global experiences of early modernity.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

History Research Lab: Virtue Politics - from Athens to America
AS.100.450 (05)

What matters most for good government: the quality of its institutions or of its rulers? Since the 16th c., western thought has focused on ‘structural’ concerns like the separation of powers. In his book Virtue Politics, James Hankins suggests that Renaissance humanism offered an alternative. Agnostic about institutions, ‘virtue politics’ cared about the souls of individuals in power. It said that the key to good politics lay in good education of the State’s leaders. This course traces ‘virtue politics’ from roots in Antiquity to ramifications for 1/6/2021 and the Poor People’s Campaign. Readings range widely across the western tradition, focusing especially on Liberal and Radical thought. They end with an evaluation of 20th- and 21st-c. American politics: from pragmatism to Civil Rights, critical pedagogy to Black feminism, fundamentalist evangelism to queer liberation. Participants collaboratively develop a “public engaging project” in lieu of a final exam.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: van den Arend, Alan R (Alan)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE

Great Minds
AS.300.102 (01)

Introductory survey of foundational texts of modern philosophy, social and political thought, and literature. This semester will include works by Plato, René Descartes, Immanuel Kant, Karl Marx, Virginia Woolf, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Iris Murdoch, Cora Diamond, Judith Butler, Kwame A. Appiah, Jacques Derrida, and others. The course is taught in lectures and in seminar discussions.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/25
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT

Women and Work in the US
AS.300.301 (01)

This course offers an introduction to the political forces, cultural values, and social factors which have shaped the history of women’s labor in the US. This course will ask question such as: Why do we place a higher value on work which takes place in the public sphere than work in the home? How do representations of work in literature and popular movies reinforce or subvert gender roles? How have women negotiated gendered and racial boundaries through political action or writing? Focusing on racialized labor, domestic labor, sex work, and factory work, the course will provide an interdisciplinary cultural study of women’s work relevant to our current historical moment. Authors discussed include Saidiya Hartman, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emma Goldman, and Kathi Weeks.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Wells, Madeline (Maddie)
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP

Transwar Japanese and Japanophone Literatures
AS.300.341 (01)

A survey of Japanese and Japanese- language literatures produced in Japan and its (former)colonies during the “transwar” period, or the several years before and after the end of WWII. This periodization enables us to take into account the shifting boundaries, sovereignties, and identities amid the intensification of Japanese imperialism and in the aftermath of its eventual demise. We aim to pay particular attention to voices marginalized in this political watershed, such as those of Japanese-language writers from colonial Korea and Taiwan, intra-imperial migrants, and radical critics of Japan’s “postwar” regime. Underlying our investigation is the question of whether literature can be an agent of justice when politics fails to deliver it. We will introduce secondary readings by Adorno, Arendt, Levinas, Derrida, and Scarry, among others, to help us interrogate this question. All readings are in English.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): INST-GLOBAL

Gender Justice: From Conflict to Resolution
AS.363.335 (01)

This course focuses on the potential and limitations of the recent efforts of the international community to introduce a "gendered approach" to conflict resolution, peacebuilding and transitional justice. It examines the fundamental theoretical issues that underlie the "gendered approach" to transitional justice by following the evolution of the gendered approach to peacebuilding in three phases through case studies: The gender-blind phase (Human Rights Trials in Argentina), the gender-neutral phase (Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa) and the gender-sensitive phase (Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of female combatants in Colombia). The limitations of the gendered approach in practice is explored through cases. For example, we examine the identification of gender-based crimes with sexual crimes in ICTY and ICTR. The LGBTI communities' inclusion to transitional justice as well as gender based harms that are not related to sexual violence are examined through the Colombia Peace Process. Ultimately, the course aims to address the prevailing question in the fields of peacebuilding and transitional justice today through the lens of "gender": Should transitional justice simply redress harms or should it aim to be transformative for the post conflict community? Should response mechanisms aim to restore relationships or should they aim to transform gender relations in communities? The final weeks of the class will be dedicated to the discussion of moral and practical implications of these questions for transitional justice.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Kirmizidag, Nur
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Digital Photography
AS.371.152 (01)

In this course students are introduced to the technical and creative study of digital photography. Students will learn the basic operation of the DSLR camera while receiving instruction in Photoshop, Lightroom, Nik software, file handling and color editing processes. Through in class demonstrations and in the field practice, students learn to use the camera’s manual settings to make accurate exposures. Lectures and discussions of historical and contemporary photographs will be introduced to give students guidance and inspiration for their own image making. The semester culminates with students creating a final portfolio of prints. Attendance in first class is mandatory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 10:00AM - 12:50PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Phyllis A
  • Room: The Centre 318  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Digital Photography
AS.371.152 (02)

In this course students are introduced to the technical and creative study of digital photography. Students will learn the basic operation of the DSLR camera while receiving instruction in Photoshop, Lightroom, Nik software, file handling and color editing processes. Through in class demonstrations and in the field practice, students learn to use the camera’s manual settings to make accurate exposures. Lectures and discussions of historical and contemporary photographs will be introduced to give students guidance and inspiration for their own image making. The semester culminates with students creating a final portfolio of prints. Attendance in first class is mandatory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 2:00PM - 4:50PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: The Centre 318  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (01)

In this course, we will explore different genres and approaches to documentary photography and the questions inherent to this mode of image-making like representation, storytelling, records and archives, journalism, community engagement, research and personal perspective. Baltimore neighborhoods and contemporary issues will provide inspiration for student work. Students will learn camera operation, photo editing and produce a final documentary project on a subject of their choice as the culmination of their semester’s work. Digital SLRs are available on loan for the semester. Attendance at first class is mandatory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: Th 2:00PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Phyllis A
  • Room: The Centre 318  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Documentary Photography
AS.371.303 (02)

In this course, we will explore different genres and approaches to documentary photography and the questions inherent to this mode of image-making like representation, storytelling, records and archives, journalism, community engagement, research and personal perspective. Baltimore neighborhoods and contemporary issues will provide inspiration for student work. Students will learn camera operation, photo editing and produce a final documentary project on a subject of their choice as the culmination of their semester’s work. Digital SLRs are available on loan for the semester. Attendance at first class is mandatory.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: F 10:00AM - 1:00PM
  • Instructor: Berger, Phyllis A
  • Room: The Centre 318  
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Nietzsche and Literature
AS.211.301 (01)

Nietzsche and Literature is devoted to exploring the philosophy and literary works of the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, and studying his impact on literature and literary modernism. Readings will include works by Nietzsche and by the literary writers he influenced, including Rainer Maria Rilke, Stefan George, Thomas Mann, Stefan Zweig, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Hermann Hesse, James Joyce, Wallace Stevens, and William Butler Yeats, and Else Lasker-Schüler.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna (Jennifer)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): MLL-ENGL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.123 (01)FYS: Wired to Read: the Science and the ArtT 4:00PM - 6:30PMEnder, Evelyne 
 
AS.040.121 (01)Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern MythmakingTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMYatromanolakis, Dimitrios 
 
AS.060.388 (01)Old World/New World WomenM 3:00PM - 5:30PMAchinstein, Sharon 
 
AS.100.450 (05)History Research Lab: Virtue Politics - from Athens to AmericaTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMvan den Arend, Alan R (Alan) 
 
HIST-MIDEST, INST-NWHIST, HIST-US, HIST-EUROPE
AS.300.102 (01)Great MindsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208
 
INST-PT
AS.300.301 (01)Women and Work in the USTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMWells, Madeline (Maddie)Gilman 208
 
INST-AP
AS.300.341 (01)Transwar Japanese and Japanophone LiteraturesF 1:30PM - 4:00PMHashimoto, SatoruGilman 208
 
INST-GLOBAL
AS.363.335 (01)Gender Justice: From Conflict to ResolutionT 3:00PM - 5:30PMKirmizidag, Nur 
 
AS.371.152 (01)Introduction to Digital PhotographyTh 10:00AM - 12:50PMBerger, Phyllis AThe Centre 318
 
AS.371.152 (02)Introduction to Digital PhotographyM 2:00PM - 4:50PMStaffThe Centre 318
 
AS.371.303 (01)Documentary PhotographyTh 2:00PM - 5:00PMBerger, Phyllis AThe Centre 318
 
AS.371.303 (02)Documentary PhotographyF 10:00AM - 1:00PMBerger, Phyllis AThe Centre 318
 
AS.211.301 (01)Nietzsche and LiteratureT 1:30PM - 4:00PMGosetti, Jennifer Anna (Jennifer) 
 
MLL-ENGL