Courses

Students are required to take ten graduate level courses (600-level) for grades in their first two years of study. Of the ten graded courses, five must be courses offered by the core faculty in the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature, including a mandatory pro-seminar on comparative methods and theory for all incoming students in the fall semester of their first year.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Theory, Now and Then: Autonomy, Form, Critique
AS.300.629 (01)

This course explores recent developments and disputes in critical theory in relation to their longer philosophical genealogies. The three topics—form, autonomy, and critique—have been the subject of much recent debate, contention, and new analysis, yet each was also a source of critical and philosophical interest in years past. Our aim will be to make sense of today’s interventions in conversation with earlier theory. “Historical” theory writing will include Adorno, Lukács, Cavell, and Jameson; contemporary theory will include Nicholas Brown, Rita Felski, Caroline Levine, Mark McGurl, and Toril Moi.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12

Dissertation Research
AS.300.803 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10

Borges, Derrida, Heidegger and the Paradoxes of Perception
AS.215.640 (01)

In this seminar we will the examine the ways in which Jorge Luis Borges’s narratives intersect with lines of inquiry pursued by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida around perception, knowledge, language, time, and space.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 12:00PM - 2:00PM
  • Instructor: Egginton, William
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15

Literary Pedagogy
AS.300.805 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5

Independent Study
AS.300.811 (01)

New course

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 1/2

Franz Kafka in Philosophical and Literary Perspective
AS.213.643 (01)

This course is devoted to close study of the writings of Franz Kafka from both philosophical and literary perspectives. Writings will include Kafka’s short prose works and novels along with philosophical and literary critical interpretations thereof. Readings may include commentaries by Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, Albert Camus, Giles Deleuze, and Giorgio Agamben. Primary texts for students from the German section will be in original; any other students may read Kafka in translation.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15

Thinking with Scale: Frameworks in Early Modernity
AS.060.620 (01)

Concepts include expansion, crowding, data collection, the miniscule, temporality, the planetary and the cosmic in the first age of European mercantile activity and colonial expansion. With readings from world-systems theory and theories of the anthropocene, our case studies will comprise pre-modern English literary texts, including Milton, Paradise Lost, Anne Bradstreet, The Four Monarchies, early modern science (Hooke, Newton), Defoe, The Storm, and early British and colonial American holdings in the Garrett Library. The class will be hands-on, working with material from Special Collections, and will include working towards a digital project (no digital project background necessary).

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Achinstein, Sharon
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/8

Historical Writing in the Middle Ages
AS.100.728 (01)

The course will begin with readings of literary and critical theory, as a preparation for the study of modes of historical writing in the Middle Ages. We will then read a sampling of medieval historiographical texts, beginning with Eusebius and continuing throughout the Middle Ages.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 2:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room:  
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room Info
AS.300.629 (01)Theory, Now and Then: Autonomy, Form, CritiqueW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSiraganian, Lisa Michele 
AS.300.803 (01)Dissertation Research 
AS.215.640 (01)Borges, Derrida, Heidegger and the Paradoxes of PerceptionW 12:00PM - 2:00PMEgginton, William 
AS.300.805 (01)Literary Pedagogy 
AS.300.811 (01)Independent StudyLisi, Leonardo 
AS.213.643 (01)Franz Kafka in Philosophical and Literary PerspectiveW 1:00PM - 3:00PMGosetti, Jennifer Anna 
AS.060.620 (01)Thinking with Scale: Frameworks in Early ModernityT 1:00PM - 4:00PMAchinstein, Sharon 
AS.100.728 (01)Historical Writing in the Middle AgesTh 2:00PM - 4:00PMSpiegel, Gabrielle M