Courses

Students are required to take ten graduate level courses (600-level) for grades in their first two years of study. Of the ten graded courses, five must be courses offered by the core faculty in the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature, including a mandatory pro-seminar on comparative methods and theory for all incoming students in the fall semester of their first year.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Poetry and Philosophy
AS.213.623 (01)

This course will trace the tensions, antagonisms, and collaborations between poetry and philosophy as distinctive but fundamental expressions of human thought and experience. We will engage poetry as a form of artistic expression that compliments, completes, or challenges other forms of knowledge, and consider the range of philosophy's responses to poetry and poetics. Readings will include works by philosophical poets and poetic philosophers including Hölderlin, Schlegel, Rilke, Bachmann, Celan, Stevens, Heidegger, Gadamer, Adorno, Benjamin, Merleau-Ponty, Valéry, Wittgenstein, and Agamben.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:00PM - 3:00PM
  • Instructor: Gosetti, Jennifer Anna
  • Room: Gilman 443  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Latin America in a Globalizing World
AS.360.623 (01)

An interdisciplinary seminar on Latin America’s role in global economic processes, from both historical and contemporary perspectives. Participants will engage with scholarly and primary texts as well as share written work. The Fall 2022 seminar will examine the topic of Latin American political thought.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 3:30PM
  • Instructor: Seguin, Becquer D, Simon, Josh David
  • Room: Gilman 308  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 22/25
  • PosTag(s): MLL-SPAN

Independent Study Field Exam
AS.300.802 (02)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.300.800 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Hashimoto, Satoru
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dissertation Research
AS.300.803 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

On Literature and Ethics
AS.300.631 (01)

Arguments for the immorality of literature, the morality of literature, and the amorality of literature. Can a literary text be evaluated on ethical grounds, and how? How do literary texts make ethical arguments? What does it mean to read literary texts or do literary criticism in an ethical mode? We will be concerned throughout with the philosophical uses, and abuses, of literary forms.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Ong, Yi-Ping
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study Field Exam
AS.300.802 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Comparative Methods and Theory: Formalism and Materialism (Graduate Pro-Seminar)
AS.300.647 (01)

This pro-seminar provides a brief overview and map of the theoretical and philosophical positions in the major debate, still ongoing, between formalism and materialism. Its aim is both theoretical and historical: to help graduate students understand the range and depth of these positions as well as their development over time, continuing to this day. We will study fundamental philosophical works (Kant, Hegel, Marx, de Beauvoir), classic theoretical texts (Propp, Lévi-Strauss, Foucault, Derrida, Bourdieu), and contemporary variations on these debates (Fish, McGurl, Moi, Pippin), to name a few. The course fulfills the pro-seminar requirements in comparative methods and theory for CTL but is open to all graduate students.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Staff
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study Field Exam
AS.300.802 (04)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Ong, Yi-Ping
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literary Pedagogy
AS.300.805 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate Independent Academic Work
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.213.623 (01)Poetry and PhilosophyW 1:00PM - 3:00PMGosetti, Jennifer AnnaGilman 443
AS.360.623 (01)Latin America in a Globalizing WorldTh 1:30PM - 3:30PMSeguin, Becquer D, Simon, Josh DavidGilman 308MLL-SPAN
AS.300.802 (02)Independent Study Field ExamStaff 
AS.300.800 (01)Independent StudyHashimoto, Satoru 
AS.300.803 (01)Dissertation Research 
AS.300.631 (01)On Literature and EthicsM 1:30PM - 4:00PMOng, Yi-PingGilman 208
AS.300.802 (01)Independent Study Field ExamMarrati, Paola 
AS.300.647 (01)Comparative Methods and Theory: Formalism and Materialism (Graduate Pro-Seminar)W 1:30PM - 4:00PMStaffGilman 208
AS.300.802 (04)Independent Study Field ExamOng, Yi-Ping 
AS.300.805 (01)Literary Pedagogy