Courses

Students are required to take ten graduate level courses (600-level) for grades in their first two years of study. Of the ten graded courses, five must be courses offered by the core faculty in the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature, including a mandatory pro-seminar on comparative methods and theory for all incoming students in the fall semester of their first year.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Introductory Topics in Computation for Scholarship in the Humanities
AS.100.682 (01)

The first half of this seminar course consists of non-mathematical introductions to, and discussions of, the fundamental motivations, vocabulary, and methods behind computational techniques of particular use for humanistic research. The second half combines selected readings chosen to address specific questions raised by these discussions with hands-on application to students' research goals. Each participant will lead discussion for one of the selected readings relevant to their interests.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:30PM
  • Instructor: Lippincott, Thomas
  • Room: Gilman 50  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Historical Writing in the Middle Ages
AS.100.728 (01)

This course investigates the basic techniques of writing history and the matters traditionally covered in medieval historical texts by reading a series of exemplary medieval historiographical works. This is preceded by a section on theoretical orientations to the study of history and historiography in order to provide the analytic tools for analyzing medieval texts.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Smokler Center 301  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Spectacle, Subjectification, and Reality Literacy in Early Modern Society
AS.215.633 (01)

In this seminar we will examine the widespread deployment of cultural production in the early modern period in the service of generating social cohesion around an emerging national project, primarily in the case of Spain. At stake will be how cultural practices can determine a shared sense of reality, often at odds with the interests of marginal groups, as well as the strategies that emerge to counteract and question those practices. While reading knowledge of Spanish is desirable, graduate students from other disciplines who wish to explore these theoretical questions with regard to a different cultural corpus are welcome. Graded Pass/Fail.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Egginton, William
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees.
AS.300.618 (01)

Knowing who or what counts as a person seems straightforward, until we consider the many kinds of creatures, objects, and artificial beings that have been granted—or demanded or denied—that status. This course explores recent debates on being a person in culture, law, and philosophy. Questions examined will include: Should trees have standing? Can corporations have religious beliefs? Could a robot sign a contract? Materials examined will be wide-ranging, including essays, philosophy, novels, science fiction, television, film. No special background is required.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Siraganian, Lisa Michele
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Concepts and Problems of Modern Philosophy, Aesthtics, and Critical Theory
AS.300.628 (01)

This seminar is addressed to first and second year graduate students as well as to advanced undergraduates. It aims at providing a survey of some fundamental concepts and problems that shape modern and contemporary debates in philosophy, literary studies, and the humanities at large. This term we will study in particular notions of existence, language, truth, power, otherness, race, gender, and reality.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room: Gilman 208  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ibsen - Strindberg - Beckett - Brecht
AS.300.634 (01)

This course examines the revolutions produced by four of the most innovative and influential figures in modern drama: Henrik Ibsen, August Strindberg, Bertolt Brecht, and Samuel Beckett. We will look in detail at specific plays and literary programs in order to trace the transformation drama underwent during this period and to probe the claims and ambitions of modern art.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room: Smokler Center 214  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dissertation Research
AS.300.803 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literary Pedagogy
AS.300.805 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor:
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.682 (01)Introductory Topics in Computation for Scholarship in the HumanitiesTh 3:00PM - 5:30PMLippincott, ThomasGilman 50
AS.100.728 (01)Historical Writing in the Middle AgesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MSmokler Center 301
AS.215.633 (01)Spectacle, Subjectification, and Reality Literacy in Early Modern SocietyW 3:00PM - 5:00PMEgginton, William 
AS.300.618 (01)What is a Person? Humans, Corporations, Robots, Trees.TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSiraganian, Lisa MicheleGilman 208
AS.300.628 (01)Introduction to Concepts and Problems of Modern Philosophy, Aesthtics, and Critical TheoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208
AS.300.634 (01)Ibsen - Strindberg - Beckett - BrechtTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLisi, LeonardoSmokler Center 214
AS.300.803 (01)Dissertation Research 
AS.300.805 (01)Literary Pedagogy