Courses

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Historical Writing in the Middle Ages
AS.100.728 (01)

The course will begin with readings of literary and critical theory, as a preparation for the study of modes of historical writing in the Middle Ages. We will then read a sampling of medieval historiographical texts, beginning with Eusebius.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): HIST-EUROPE

Contemporaneity and Crisis
AS.215.718 (01)

How should one study contemporary literature and culture? Is “the contemporary” a period in and of itself? Does it require a distinct conceptual approach? This graduate seminar will examine various approaches that have emerged since Michel Foucault called his genealogies a “history of the present.” We will pay special attention to contemporary literature and culture’s most distinguishing feature today: crisis. Considering theories of crisis and “the contemporary” together, the course will explore how living in a time of overlapping crises—economic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and others—affects the way we interpret the world.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/18
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRAD-CAMS

Modernist Primitivism
AS.211.754 (01)

This course will explore the aesthetics and politics of primitivism in European modernity, focusing on the visual arts and literature in German and Yiddish, but looking at the wider European context, including France and Russia. We will begin with the backgrounds of primitivism in Romanticism, looking especially at its ethnographic and colonial sources. We will then focus on the presence of anthropological and ethnographic discourses within various registers of modernist thought, literature, and visual culture, with special attention to visual and literary primitivism. Our central concerns will include: the attempt to create a modernist aesthetics grounded in ethnography; the primitivist critique of modernity; the place of primitivism in the historical avant-garde; the development of the notion of “culture” in modernity; and the aesthetics of modern ethnic and national identity. Key thinkers, artists, and writers to be considered include Herder; Gauguin; Picasso; Wilhelm Worringer; Carl Einstein; Hannah Höch; and Emil Nolde.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM

Independent Study
AS.300.800 (04)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/1
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ind Stdy-Field Exams
AS.300.801 (02)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 0/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Immersive Poetics and Permeable Screens
AS.300.621 (01)

Victor Shklovsky claimed that the art exists “to return sensation to life, to make us feel objects, to make a stone feel stony.” This seminar examines various ways of understanding Shklovsky’s concept of ostranenie (“enstrangement”) across media (literature, art, cinema, and beyond) and in comparative perspective, considering the problematics of politics, philosophy, and aesthetic form. Students will be encouraged to present on texts in their own area of expertise over the course of the term.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.300.800 (05)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study
AS.300.800 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ind Stdy-Field Exams
AS.300.801 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Ariadne’s Threads: Metamorphosing Mythologies
AS.211.714 (01)

Abandoned by Theseus, Ariadne lamenting on the shore of Naxos embodies one of the most powerful tropes in literature and the arts. The fate of the heroine who helped Theseus out of the labyrinth became herself a thread (indeed, an inexhaustible series of threads) running across the ages and populating the imagination of poets, painters, composers. After exploring in detail the classical sources that canonized Ariadne’s myth (Catullus, Carmina, 64; Ovid, Heroides, 10) as well as references to the myth found in other classical authors (Homer, Hesiod, Pausanias, Plutarch, Propertius), we will turn to the reception of Ariadne in literature and music (Ariosto, Rinuccini-Monteverdi, Haydn, Nietzsche, Strauss-Von Hofmannsthal). The analysis of the various case studies will focus on the rhetorical and poetical devices used by poets and composers to reenact the vocal features of Ariadne’s lament.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/14
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Ind Stdy-Field Exams
AS.300.801 (03)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dissertation Research
AS.300.803 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

In Study Field Exam
AS.300.809 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

In Study Field Exam
AS.300.809 (02)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/2
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literary Pedagogy
AS.300.805 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.728 (01)Historical Writing in the Middle AgesTh 2:00PM - 4:00PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 314HIST-EUROPE
AS.215.718 (01)Contemporaneity and CrisisT 1:00PM - 3:00PMSeguin, Becquer DGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRAD-CAMS
AS.211.754 (01)Modernist PrimitivismTh 12:00PM - 2:00PMSpinner, Samuel JacobGilman 479GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-GERM
AS.300.800 (04)Independent StudyMarrati, Paola 
AS.300.801 (02)Ind Stdy-Field ExamsEakin Moss, Anne, Marrati, Paola 
AS.300.621 (01)Immersive Poetics and Permeable ScreensT 1:30PM - 3:50PMEakin Moss, AnneGilman 208
AS.300.800 (05)Independent StudyMarrati, Paola 
AS.300.800 (01)Independent StudyLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.801 (01)Ind Stdy-Field ExamsMarrati, Paola 
AS.211.714 (01)Ariadne’s Threads: Metamorphosing MythologiesTh 2:00PM - 4:00PMRefini, EugenioGilman 108GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.300.801 (03)Ind Stdy-Field ExamsLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.803 (01)Dissertation ResearchLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.809 (01)In Study Field ExamLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.809 (02)In Study Field ExamLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.805 (01)Literary PedagogyLisi, Leonardo 

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Critical Unconscious
AS.211.777 (01)

Criticism in the 21st century has tended to relegate psychoanalysis to a dustbin of fads that proliferated at the end of the prior century but that today are of interest only to balkanized cliques of devotees. Bucking this trend, this seminar will examine the intellectual history and abiding influence of psychoanalysis’s key critical concept: the unconscious. Basing our discussions on in-depth readings from key thinkers in the analytic tradition such as Freud, Lacan, and Klein, as well as the post-analytic philosophical tradition, including Zizek, Butler, Laclau and Mouffe, Deleuze and Guattari, and Jameson, we will work to distill an understanding of the unconscious as essential to the practice of criticism tout court, and as inhering even in those discourses that have sought most stridently to distance themselves from it. Seminar discussions will take place in English; readings will be available in the original as well as in translation.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/20
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Ricardo Piglia, Borges, Derrida and Argentina's Eighteenth Century
AS.215.613 (01)

A voice in Piglia’s Artificial Respiration claims that Argentina did not have an eighteenth century or the Eighteenth Century. Besides Piglia’s palimpsest novel, we’ll study a handful of texts by Borges. Passages from Leopoldo Marechal’s Adan Buenosayres, and Derrida’s The Beast and the Sovereign Volume Two, in reference to Heidegger’s The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics and Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe. Taught in English.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/15
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL

Independent Study Field Exam
AS.300.802 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Theory and Praxis of Modern Tragedy
AS.300.619 (01)

This course will examine the philosophy and drama of modern tragedy through the close reading and comparison of a number of key works. We will study plays by Shakespeare (Hamlet and King Lear), de la Barca (Life is a Dream), Racine (Phèdre), Hölderlin (Death of Empedocles), and Ibsen (Master Builder and Hedda Gabler) in conjunction with philosophical writings by Pascal, Leopardi, Hegel, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Carl Schmitt, Heidegger and Cavell. Course is open to open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Literature and Truth: Forgery and Fakes
AS.211.606 (01)

Forgery is an eternal problem. It is a literary tradition in its own right, with connections to politics, Classics, religion, philosophy, and literary theory. Spurious writings impinge on social and political realities to a degree rarely confronted by criticism. This course offers a reading of the sort traditionally reserved for canonical works of poetry and prose fiction, spotlighting forgery’s imaginative vitality and its sinister impact on scholarship. Students will study manuscripts and incunabula drawn from JHU’s Bibliotheca Fictiva, the world’s premier collection of literary forgeries.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/12
  • PosTag(s): GRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL

Literary Pedagogics
AS.300.806 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Dissertation Research
AS.300.804 (01)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available:
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Independent Study Field Exam
AS.300.802 (04)

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 5/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Happy and Unhappy Words: Austin, Wittgenstein, and Cavell
AS.300.638 (01)

This seminar studies how words help shaping the world we inhabit and how the power and limits of language affect the possibility of living in a shared world in the works of Austin, Wittgenstein, Cavell and others.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Painting and Subjectivity
AS.010.632 (01)

Readings from a range of theoretically and philosophically interesting texts on painting and the visual arts. Among our authors: Cavell, Lacan, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Derrida, Nancy, Lyotard.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): HART-MODERN

How to Read Proust?
AS.300.601 (01)

Given the difficulty of his prose, closely and patiently would seem the best way to read Proust, but who has time – time to read a book that, ironically, begins with “Longtemps” and ends with “le temps”? This course will offer for critical examination surgically selected passages of A la Recherche du Temps Perdu as a training ground for the (lost?) art of close reading and as entry points into wide-ranging aspects of literary criticism and theory. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of the instructor. Taught in English. Knowledge of French is desirable, but not required.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 16/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.211.777 (01)The Critical UnconsciousTh 1:00PM - 3:00PMEgginton, WilliamMergenthaler 431GRLL-ENGL
AS.215.613 (01)Ricardo Piglia, Borges, Derrida and Argentina's Eighteenth CenturyT 1:00PM - 3:00PMGonzalez, EduardoGilman 479GRLL-ENGL
AS.300.802 (01)Independent Study Field ExamMarrati, Paola 
AS.300.619 (01)Theory and Praxis of Modern TragedyTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLisi, LeonardoGilman 208
AS.211.606 (01)Literature and Truth: Forgery and FakesW 3:00PM - 5:30PMHavens, Earle Ashcroft, II., Stephens, Walter EBLC MackseyGRLL-ENGL, GRLL-ITAL
AS.300.806 (01)Literary PedagogicsStaff 
AS.300.804 (01)Dissertation ResearchLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.802 (04)Independent Study Field ExamOng, Yi-Ping 
AS.300.638 (01)Happy and Unhappy Words: Austin, Wittgenstein, and CavellM 4:00PM - 6:30PMMarrati, PaolaGilman 208
AS.010.632 (01)Painting and SubjectivityW 4:00PM - 6:00PMWarnock, MollyGilman 177HART-MODERN
AS.300.601 (01)How to Read Proust?W 4:30PM - 6:30PMEnder, EvelyneGilman 208