Courses

Students are required to take ten graduate level courses (600-level) for grades in their first two years of study. Of the ten graded courses, five must be courses offered by the core faculty in the Department of Comparative Thought and Literature, including a mandatory pro-seminar on comparative methods and theory for all incoming students in the fall semester of their first year.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Historical Writing in the Middle Ages
AS.100.728 (01)

This course investigates the basic techniques of writing history and the matters traditionally covered in medieval historical texts by reading a series of exemplary medieval historiographical works. This is period is preceded by a section on theoretical orientations to the study of history and historiography in order to provide the analytic tools for analyzing medieval texts.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 3:00PM - 5:00PM
  • Instructor: Spiegel, Gabrielle M
  • Room: Gilman 17
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/8
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Concept of World: From Descartes to the Apocalypse
AS.300.622 (01)

In this course we will examine the idea of the world as it operates in a range of different literary, philosophical, and theoretical contexts. Beginning with the birth of the modern world in texts like Camões’s “The Lusíads,” Descartes’s “Le Monde,” and More’s “Utopia,” we will pursue its evolution through Baumgarten’s invention of aesthetics, Kant’s critique of dialectical reason, Husserl’s phenomenology, and Heidegger’s fundamental ontology, to the rise of world literature and the study of indigenous cosmologies in contemporary anthropology. We conclude with reflections on the end of our world in the Anthropocene and its implication for the humanistic disciplines. This course serves as the proseminar in methods and theory for graduate students in Comparative Thought and Literature but is open to students in all departments.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: Th 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Lisi, Leonardo
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Logics of Recognition
AS.300.624 (01)

Since the publication of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit, the struggle of consciousness for recognition has played an important role in moral and political philosophy. This seminar aims at studying Hegel’s account of subjectivity and its antagonistic encounter with the other as well as the responses and critiques it has elicited in contemporary philosophy. Readings include Foucault, Butler, Derrida, Lévinas, Cavell, Honneth and others.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Marrati, Paola
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 20/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Media Theory and Modernity
AS.360.612 (01)

This course will engage with 20th century critical theory and social inquiry that wrestles with the idea that new mediations have profoundly altered the character of human experience and subjectivity, and it will consider the questions that these theorists pose for our disciplines. How have modern subjectivity, gender, affect, reason, and politics been shaped by the technologies and structures of representation that mediate them? Among figures of interest: Marx, Freud, Eisenstein, Benjamin, Bakhtin, Adorno, Deleuze, Guy Debord, Haraway, Stuart Hall, Teresa de Lauretis, Kitterer, Sobchack, Berlant, Latour, Linda Williams, Ranciere, Orit Halpern.

  • Credits: 0.00
  • Level: Graduate
  • Days/Times: F 12:00PM - 2:30PM
  • Instructor: Eakin Moss, Anne, Moss, Kenneth
  • Room:  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.100.728 (01)Historical Writing in the Middle AgesTh 3:00PM - 5:00PMSpiegel, Gabrielle MGilman 17
AS.300.622 (01)The Concept of World: From Descartes to the ApocalypseTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMLisi, Leonardo 
AS.300.624 (01)Logics of RecognitionM 1:30PM - 4:00PMMarrati, Paola 
AS.360.612 (01)Media Theory and ModernityF 12:00PM - 2:30PMEakin Moss, Anne, Moss, Kenneth